þriðjudagur, febrúar 21, 2006

skyr ain't yogurt

OK, all you Googlers searching for "skyr yogurt". Get this through your heads: skyr is skyr. Yogurt is yogurt. Two totally different things, and never the twain shall meet. If you want yogurt, go back to Stonyfield Farms, or wherever, and pick up some of their slop. If you want skyr, the stuff with the tang, the stuff that leaves chalk residue in your mouth, the real-man Icelandic take-no-prisoners made-since-the-year-1000 stuff, the food that built a nation, then that's just "skyr". That's all you need to write.

And for you British types with your effeminate yogurt-with-an-H spelling, well, don't even get me started...

12 Comments:

Anonymous Nafnlaus said...

MMMMM,SKYR

21.2.06  
Anonymous Nafnlaus said...

Delish!!!! SKYR

None of the damn cow hormones like in yogurt. (not yoghurt)

21.2.06  
Blogger Farbror Willy said...

My roommate in Sweden used to make Skyr out of plain yog(h)urt, by draining it of fluid using a dish towel and a sigti. Then used the result to make his delicious skyr cake... jömmí. The stuff tasted actually quite like skyr although I guess it wasn't the real thing.

21.2.06  
Blogger Alda said...

What's effeminate about writing yoghurt with an H?

21.2.06  
Blogger JB said...

Aaaah! Don't do that...! Aaaah...! It looks so... so... wrong!

Maybe it's the embedded "hurt" that makes that spelling seem so wimpy. There's just no reason to drop an extra H in there.

Webster's lists a third spelling, which I have never seen: "yoghourt". Now that's just silly.

21.2.06  
Anonymous Nafnlaus said...

JB, there is just one English and that is british English, all the other variants are just plain silly.
Of course you write yoghurt just like you write armour, amour etc. etc.

25.2.06  
Blogger JB said...

Actually, and I checked this out: the Turkish word that the English language took "yogurt" from is spelled "yogurt". So, the British must have added that silly "h" out of a sense of inadequacy.

I fail to see how yogurt has anything to do with armor. And, maybe once upon a time British English was "da shizzle" but these days, to most of the wourld, it's just a provincial variation. Sorry.

25.2.06  
Anonymous Nafnlaus said...

OMG JB...if you would have studied at the higher institutions in Iceland it is the 'Queens' English and nothing less.
Webster's....is not a dictionary, but the OED. One wasn't allowed to use anything BUT the OED a the finer schools in Iceland.
So, Yoghurt it is :p

25.2.06  
Blogger JB said...

Queen? Who? And who said anything about Webster? (Even though he is NH's finest...)

http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=yogurt

Sorry, Brits. Keep your quaint spellings. They're cute, and they help sell Jaguars.

25.2.06  
Blogger cK said...

My friend Betsy once asked me, "Do you cross your 7s and Zs?" I looked at her warily, abruptly aware of the effeminate charge she was going to make. "Yeah," I said. "My husband does that too," she said flatly. I still cross my Zs, but I've stopped crossing 7s.

I never would spell yogurt with an "h." That's goofy, though I admit a fondness for the British "grey."

Southern friends insist I say "yo-guh-ret," though I can't hear it. Of course, I live in the northern Midwest. We say "bolth," not "both."

Gots to find me some skyr. ...
-cK

4.5.06  
Blogger Mo'a said...

Glad that you set the record straight on Skyr and Yogurt without an H thank you very much.... although my English College Education is responsible for my confusion between gray and grey and color and colour.....oh!! well it must be that I use both the OED and the AHD

5.5.06  
Anonymous Nafnlaus said...

does anyone know if Skyr is sold in hong kong?

10.11.07  

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